The Elementary School Drop-off and Pick-up Woes!

Dismissal time from school—ask many moms who pick their children up and the stories will just start.  You’ll hear stories of people nearly getting hit people or of cars getting dinged.  You might hear stories about parents yelling at each other or using hand gestures to communicate their frustrations to each other.  You’ll hear about mothers grasping the steering wheel in frustration while simultaneously trying not to curse with the kids in the car.  (Oh wait, that might be me.)

Why does all of this happen?  Why do normally rational people, who typically obey traffic laws, park wherever they want, despite the amount of cars that become blocked in by people doing whatever they want?  Why do some people feel they can just cross the roadway with their kid’s hand clenched in theirs, even when they see a car coming?

I’ve always found the entitlement that occurs during pick up and drop off to be interesting.  It’s so frustrating to me to be waiting to get to a safe spot to pull over to drop off my kids and the person in front of me is dilly-dallying.  Is it really necessary to pull over (to the drop off area that is supposed to move quickly), get out of the car at a snail’s speed, get little Johnny out of the car, grab his backpack from the TRUNK (why doesn’t he have it in the backseat with him??) and then make a production out of the hugs and kisses you have to give him?  The best is when the mom stands there and watches him walk up the steps and into the building and waves the entire time.

I somewhat understand why people are frustrated in the afternoon.  People are rushing to get home and get homework done, or they need to go to an activity or they need to go to another school to pick up another child.  The latter is my frustration this year.  Both kids are in two different schools, but they get out at the same time.  My oldest gets a bit nervous waiting for me, even though he now has a cell phone and calls to find out when I’ll be there, so I feel the need to rush to get to him.  Even so, I still don’t park wherever I want and block people in so that I can get out first.   That’s just obnoxious.

Do you have any interesting tales to tell about drop-off and dismissal at your kids’ school?

**Note: the drop-off scenario mentioned above does not represent a particular person.  This represents a combination of many scenarios I’ve observed over the years.

It’s amazing what brings me back…..

Photo courtesy of bestclipartblog.com

Photo courtesy of bestclipartblog.com

I was recently looking for some information on my university’s website.  As I was looking through the site, trying to find what I was researching, I came across the flow sheet for my major.

I got goose bumps.

Why, you wonder?

When I was trying to apply to my university in the spring of 2011, I remember printing out that flow sheet and bringing it to my meeting with an admissions counselor.  Would they accept me?  After all, my early college days left a lot to be desired.  I brought that sheet with me to see if admissions could help me figure out where my transfer credits could fit into the program.  I recall the counselor looking at my transcript, getting up and saying she needed to get something and she came back with this gigantic master list to see what courses from my previous college corresponded to courses at my current school.  She also came back with a copy of the flow sheet and she was shocked that I had actually printed one from the website and brought it with me.  (Maybe that was a sign that I was becoming a go-getter?)

I think I cried when I got home from that meeting.  My previous college experience wasn’t a complete waste and courses would transfer.  I was shocked and thrilled when she said I’d be accepted.

A lot has happened since that meeting and I have become someone I wouldn’t have expected to become.  Going back to school has changed my work ethic and my drive to succeed.  I have pushed myself harder than I ever expected to.  I remember just wanting to get decent grades, get that “piece of paper” and be a good example for my boys.

Before I know it, graduation will be here and this experience of going back to school will be a distant memory, another chapter in my book of life.  Until then, I continue to take it all in and enjoy the story that is constantly developing.

I have to find a job??

(Photo credit: www.gograph.com )

(Photo credit: http://www.gograph.com)

 

I’m writing this blog post right after completing a job search assignment that is required for my seminar class at school. Seniors in my department are required to take this course as a way to prepare for branding oneself, putting together a portfolio of work, and searching for a job. It’s a great class, and I feel like it’s a beneficial tool that is offered.

But it’s scary.  

I have to look for a job and that scares the daylights out of me.

Being a stay-at-home mom for so many years and being almost at the point where I am looking to return to the work force is intimidating to me. Part of my assignment that I just completed was about looking at job listings, finding three that were appealing and writing a short paper about why I was qualified for my top of choice. That’s a scary proposition for someone who hasn’t worked full-time in over 12 years.

The idea of looking for a job has made me nervous since the spring.  After the spring semester ended, I had nightmares about the job search process. Randomly, in July, I woke up some mornings to vent to my husband about my fears. Am I truly qualified? Will my age be a deterrent to my success? How will a full-time job impact our family? Will I find a job before the six month deferment window on my student loans expires?

I have to breathe, and believe that I will be prepared for this by the time I graduate. (227 days until graduation, by the way.) In the meantime, I am taking advantage of my education and the pre-professional opportunities I have available to me, and doing everything I can to ensure my success. It’s better than being complacent and just hoping something comes my way.